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Alzheimer’s affects the ability of the intestine to absorb the active substance of a drug

Alzheimer’s affects the ability of the intestine to absorb the active substance of a drug

Alzheimer’s is considered a disease of the central nervous system. It is a clinical condition that to date has no cure: it is possible to slow down its course, but complete recovery is not yet achievable. What are the new findings regarding drug therapies?

 

Advertising Message Patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are often prescribed medications for other conditions, including diabetes or hypertension, at the same dosage as those administered to patients without dementia (Jin & Tran, 2020). This practice may need to be reviewed based on new studies in mice reported in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics. The results suggest that AD may alter the absorption of drugs in the digestive tract, therefore, it may be necessary to change the dosage for these patients (Jin & Tran, 2020).

Alzheimer’s is considered a disease of the central nervous system, it is characterized by the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary clusters in the brain, unfortunately it is a clinical condition that today knows no cure, it is possible to slow down its course, however it is not yet reachable complete recovery, it is also the most common and frequent dementia among the over 65s (Hardy & Higgins, 1992).

Scientists mainly focused on studying drugs that can cross the blood brain barrier (BEE). Their research revealed that the amount and function of the proteins that transport drugs through the BEE are altered in people with AD. However, less attention has been paid to other biological barriers, such as the lining of the intestine, through which oral medications pass into the bloodstream. The few studies published on this topic, however, suggest that this absorption process could be interrupted by Azlheimer disease (Jin & Tran, 2020).

Advertising message Through experimentation on mice, the researchers measured the absorption of compounds that move from the small intestine to the bloodstream. For example, plasma levels of diazepam, which passively spreads through intestinal cells to reach blood flow, were similar in both AD group mice and control (without AD) mice. However, there are differences from drug to drug, in fact the replication of the same experiment, made this time using valsartan, found that the mice belonging to the AD group had less concentration of the active ingredient of the drug in the plasma, compared to the mice belonging to the control group (Jin & Tran, 2020).

The passage of these drugs through intestinal cells is controlled by transporters that could be interrupted by the CEO (Jin & Tran, 2020).

The results are indicative of the likely need to change the pharmacological approach to the patient with Alzheimer’s disease, however, they must be replicated on the human being (given that the above research was conducted on mice), if the results were to be similar then yes will outline the absolute need to reduce the pharmacological doses of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (Jin & Tran, 2020).