Mind
Mindfulness to support distance learning

Mindfulness to support distance learning

With the extraordinary and sudden suspension of teaching activities in all schools in Italy following the Covid-19 emergency, teachers, pupils and students found themselves facing an unprecedented situation, which totally projected them into the use of Didactics Remote (DaD).

 

Advertising message A use to which the vast majority of committed staff and interested students were not prepared and which, on the one hand, is faced with the urgency and emergency of giving continuity to teaching, in respect of an alienable constitutional right to study and, on the other, to face the insecurities, the unpreparedness, the disorientation that in some cases this situation is causing. A condition of difficulty that adds to the already present stressful situations that entire families are experiencing due to the emergency; social isolation, fear, economic difficulties, and in some cases, even illness or bereavement in the family are just some of the worries and difficulties that families are facing in this emergency.

In some cases, DaD can come to represent an additional source of stress in addition to the post-traumatic stress that begins to be felt in Italian families (and not only). In a scenario such as the one just described, it becomes essential to deal with an idea of ​​pupils and students who are probably different from those with which each teacher was accustomed to interfacing until recently. In these weeks, male and female students have been catapulted into a dimension of loneliness, of bewilderment and, in many cases, of loss and distortion of their normal daily routine. Further anguish and fear of not being able to meet the deadlines given by your teachers, of not having a working or perhaps free computer, because used by another member of the family, not having an active data connection, they risk further impairing the concentration and attention skills already severely undermined by the difficulties given by chance. If already in face-to-face teaching, the educational relationship could be considered an essential basis on which to be able to engage every learning process, now more than ever, every teacher is called to support and support their students and pupils in one of the most difficult and complex periods in history Contemporary. It is therefore important to privilege the empathic relationship to favor the process of building knowledge and developing skills and competences, by understanding the mental states that young people, boys and children are experiencing in this period of emergency. In this perspective, the use of mindfulness can be considered of considerable support to DaD. A practice of awareness at the beginning of a video lesson, for example, can certainly favor a dimension of concentration and conscious attention in both students and teachers and promote the relational climate of sharing useful for the achievement of closeness objectives (as well as learning) by both actors of the relationship. In all likelihood, in this period of total or partial isolation, attention is probably directed towards the past and characterized by the melancholy of those “pieces of life” from which we were suddenly torn, and towards the future, in terms of uncertainty and fear of what may be. A practice of awareness at the beginning of a video lesson, for example, can certainly favor a dimension of concentration and conscious attention in both students and teachers and promote the relational climate of sharing useful for the achievement of closeness objectives (as well as learning) by both actors of the relationship. In all likelihood, in this period of total or partial isolation, attention is probably directed towards the past and characterized by the melancholy of those “pieces of life” from which we were suddenly torn, and towards the future, in terms of uncertainty and fear of what may be. A practice of awareness at the beginning of a video lesson, for example, can certainly favor a dimension of concentration and conscious attention in both students and teachers and promote the relational climate of sharing useful for the achievement of closeness objectives (as well as learning) by both actors of the relationship. In all likelihood, in this period of total or partial isolation, attention is probably directed towards the past and characterized by the melancholy of those “pieces of life” from which we were suddenly torn, and towards the future, in terms of uncertainty and fear of what may be. it can certainly favor a dimension of concentration and conscious attention in both students and teachers and promote the relational climate of sharing useful for the achievement of objectives of closeness (as well as learning) by both actors of the relationship. In all likelihood, in this period of total or partial isolation, attention is probably directed towards the past and characterized by the melancholy of those “pieces of life” from which we were suddenly torn, and towards the future, in terms of uncertainty and fear of what may be. it can certainly favor a dimension of concentration and conscious attention in both students and teachers and promote the relational climate of sharing useful for the achievement of objectives of closeness (as well as learning) by both actors of the relationship. In all likelihood, in this period of total or partial isolation, attention is probably directed towards the past and characterized by the melancholy of those “pieces of life” from which we were suddenly torn, and towards the future, in terms of uncertainty and fear of what may be.

Advertising message Mindfulness, as an anchoring practice to the here and now, at every single moment, can accompany towards a greater ability to live in the present, weakening that rumination given in our mind by memories, emotions, sensations and thoughts that return obsessively . At the same time, it promotes a more attentive and compassionate vision towards one’s emotions and, through sharing, also towards the emotions of others. In this way, meditative practice comes to represent a very effective tool for the (re) construction of a working group, a class, which, despite the distance, may be able to re-establish (and improve) its relational connections and emotional, also promoting a process of mutual support and support,

In this perspective, mindfulness therefore becomes a “good practice” to support DaD, promoting well-being, optimism and resilience, alleviating anxiety and depression.